Motion Picture Film Technology [Volume I: Prologue] : Take a seat

Motion Picture Film. Pretty self-explanatory and a revelation in itself as to how it works. There are plenty of sites devoted to the art of crafting a story through these moving images. Yet, when you begin to search for the science behind the form you are given a pretty mess of disheveled facts with no apparent cohesion. And why should you? To understand all you could about motion picture film technology would require several lifetimes unwrapping a complete understanding in chemistry, physics, mechanics, optics, signal processing, computer engineering, programming; we’re only just starting to discuss the elementary avenues involved.
That’s what this blog will attempt to do: To provide a comprehensive on the technology of motion picture film-making.
Why should you understand as many technological angles as you can in the creation of screened stories?
You might shouldn’t. You might should just make a damn film.
But also ask why film? Why should you tell your story on film, as opposed to writing a novel, poem, song?
If you can, then buy a pen, some paper and -if a song- the instruments you need. Go tell your story in the form of a play. Create a giant art installation piece of your favorite fruit and attach it to the side of a building.
Do not waste your time telling your story on film if you haven’t the guts to face what is required of you to pull it off.
Let’s continue to filter.
If you’ve got endless cash to throw at your problems, stop reading.
No? If you’ve got all the right friends in all the right places who love you enough to do an awesome job for no monetary compensation, stop reading.
No? If papa pays your rent and bought your car…stop reading.
If you’re broke, stop reading.
All right. Now that I’m here by myself writing to myself, I can continue.
Let’s make pretty pictures.

About agentjj20

Shua Jackson works as a VFX Supervisor out of the Upstate, SC. He also keeps busily involved in film directing and producing.

Posted on August 24, 2011, in Volume I: Film Technology. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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